Questions? Call Us!

(781) 961-1800

Pushing the Envelope Beyond Ordinary

Offset Printing for Envelopes

Posted by Jerry Velona on Jun 2, 2017 12:02:50 PM

Envelope printing has come a long way since the days when Confederate soldiers folded wallpaper to serve as a carrier for their letters home.

These days, the vast majority of the estimated 400 billion envelopes used annually worldwide are printed in 4 ways: offset, flexographic, flat sheet litho and digital. In today’s post, we will focus on offset printing.

The name offset comes from the process whereby a metal printing plate is burned with the image which is then transferred or “offset” to a printing blanket.  The blanket is attached to a roller in the press and coated with ink. The envelope is fed through the press and is printed with the image when it comes in contact with the ink-covered blanket.  Small, 2 color offset presses such as Multi and AB Dick can be adapted to print envelopes with the use of an envelope feeder.  While relatively slow, these do an OK job for small quantity runs (2,500 or fewer).

For anything over that quantity, envelopes are most economically printed on a Jet press. These presses are specially designed for envelope printing and some of the newer models can achieve speeds up to 40,000 per hour or more. Those of us in the biz will use the word “jet” as a verb as in “those envelopes need to be jetted”.  This is sometimes confused with ink-jetting which is a completely different animal (used to print addresses on bulk mailings).  Jet is a brand name for envelope printing presses made by the Halm Corporation.  The vast majority of offset printing for custom printed envelopes are done by this type and brand. The quality is excellent and very consistent.

 _MG_0147-1.jpg

How do you know if offset printing is right for your envelope job?  The two main criteria to consider are the quantity you are looking for and the specific graphic image you want printed.

Quantity: - Offset printing is the most economical way to go on jobs of 2,500 and over. If the job must be done with offset printing, quantities from a handful to around 2,500 are most economically printed on one of the smaller, (non-Jet) presses previously mentioned.  (Digital printing is perhaps an even better option for these small runs, more on that in a subsequent post)  Anything 2,500 or more would be best sent to an actual envelope company which utilizes Jet presses.  

Quality: - Certain graphic images such as those containing fine lines, long, thin lines, half-tones (photos) screens (lighter shades of a darker color made by a concentration of tiny dots of varying density) or tight registration (a combination of images placed very close together or actually touching) generally require offset printing for best results. An envelope printing expert can tell from viewing your artwork what the best printing method would be for your custom printed envelopes.

I’ll get into the other main envelope printing methods in my next posts.

How do you print your envelopes these days?

Topics: elite envelope, envelope printing, offset printing, custom envelope printing

New Years Ruminations & Some Good News for Mailers

Posted by Jerry Velona on Jan 24, 2017 10:05:23 AM

First of all, Happy New Year to all those who follow and read my blog. I wish everyone the best for success and happiness in 2017.  Despite the fact that I write this in a cold weather climate (Boston) and the days are short, there’s always a certain positive energy associated with a new year at least to me. It’s a clean slate; time to refresh the screen and figure out what’s possible.  Of course the figuring-out part is a lot easier than the executing part.  I think that’s where a lot of people get stuck in the mud. Oh well, it’s always worth a try! 

I always wonder how far into January you go before you stop wishing people happy new year. I write this on January 22nd. This will definitely be the last week where I’m extending those wishes.  Don’t ask me why. It just seems about the right time to end it.

Of course before we know it, everyone will be saying, “I can’t believe it’s March/April/May already”.  So the moral is, make the most of 2017 because it will be over before you realize what happened.

One last thing on New Year’s and good intentions; one of the hardy perennial new year’s resolutions is to be more organized. With the amount of raw data most of us are bombarded with each day, I think it’s more important than ever to be able to sort through the never-ending amount of digital messages we receive and still have time to be productive.  My friend Lorena Prime has a very successful company called “Clearly Organized”.  Her website has lots of useful information and Lorena does seminars and consulting for business and individuals.  Lorena’s great and I encourage anyone who has that problem or runs a business where it’s a problem with staff to contact her.

So, as we know everything in life involves trade-offs. The information overload and fatigue it can cause is one side of the coin. The other side is how much great information is out there literally at our fingertips which can help us and save us time and money. 

I happened to come across a great article by Adam Lewenberg of Postal Advocate in Wayland, MA.  Adam writes for Mailing Systems Technology magazine and has analyzed and broken down the new postal rates that have taken effect on January 22nd, 2017. 

Overall, the rate increases are minor and they contain some good news for direct mailers and direct marketers as well as those that supply direct mail printing and printed envelopes for direct mail. 

Perhaps the biggest and best news is that automated (pre-sorted) mail will have a single, flat rate from 1 ounce up to 3.5 ounces.  This will enable marketers to put a lot more in the envelope for the same price.

Adam’s article has a whole bunch of useful information about the new rates along with some tips on how to save money on your next campaign.  Kudos to him for laying this out in such a clear and concise fashion.

So again,  Happy New Year (for the last time in 2017) and may all your direct mail campaigns be smooth and effective!

Topics: direct mail, elite envelope, post office, direct mail printing, printed envelopes

Elite Envelope Goes Solar!

Posted by Jerry Velona on Dec 14, 2016 12:33:24 PM

So I was shocked twice this morning.  First, when I realized I hadn’t written a blog entry in over a month (I know, I know you’ve all been sitting at your desks each morning wondering where it’s been). And secondly when I looked at the calendar twice to see that it’s indeed December 14th and Christmas is next Sunday(!)  

 Rather than try to explain the inexplicable; i.e. how another year has apparently come and almost gone, I’m going to jump right into the topic of the day which is the value of renewable energy in the printing and envelope industry and the importance of accurate claims in this regard.

 As anyone who follows this blog is aware, I’ve been skeptical of the claims made by some of our competitors that a particular envelope was manufactured or printed using wind power.  In fact, “skeptical” may not be the right word.  “Dismissive” might be more accurate.  The way this works is that a company will purchase what are known as Renewable Energy Credits or REC’s.  These represent a purchase of a certain amount of power that is actually produced by a random wind farm somewhere in the US. The theory is that the power once purchased goes into the grid and is available for use by someone/anyone.  So this energy is thought to replace power that would have been produced using conventional fossil fuels.

I’ve always thought this to be a bit squirrelly and you can read why here.   But I’ve also said that if you really want to make a difference and think that renewable energy is important, then by all means put your money where your mouth is and you’ll get no quarrel from me.

That’s what we’ve done at Elite Envelope & Graphics.  As of the beginning of 2017, we will begin generating somewhere between one half and three quarters of our total energy consumption through an array of solar panels that we’ve just installed on our brand new roof.

Elite Solar JV standing.jpg  

To be honest, our primary reason for doing this was economics.  Between the incentives provided by the Federal and State governments, the system will pay for itself in a fairly short time after which our monthly savings on electricity will be substantial well into the future. And once all the impending breakthroughs in large, storage battery technology I’ve been reading about come to fruition, it’s possible that we could be completely self-sufficient in our energy usage in the not-too-distant future.

But aside from the economics,  there are certainly environmental benefits to consuming less fossil fuel and we will now be in a position to print this (below) on our customer’s envelopes and have it be literally accurate.  There’s a lot to be said for truth in advertising!   Let us know if we can help you impress your customers.

Solar Power Logo Sun.jpg

 

Topics: elite envelope, envelope printing, envelope manufacturing, going green

Bubble Envelopes & Recycling

Posted by Jerry Velona on Nov 3, 2016 2:33:50 PM

I was raised not to waste. As a child growing up in the northern New Jersey suburbs, wasting anything was one of the worst things we could do. The ethic of conservation around our house was neatly summed up in the aphorism quoted to me innumerable times by my grandmother and my mother: “use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without”.  I also heard, “waste not, want not” more than a few times for good measure. We were the children and grandchildren of the generations that lived through the Great Depression and the hard lessons of that era were drummed into most of us growing up in the 60’s and the 70’s. 

 I don’t believe I owned a pair of “play pants” (as they were quaintly referred to) that didn’t have multiple patches stitched into them by my grandmother and her trusty Singer sewing machine.  When I’d make another hole (we played hard back then!) I’d just get another patch. It was no big deal and nothing embarrassing to me.  And we weren’t poor, by the way.  We lived in a small but comfortable single family home in a solidly middle class neighborhood.

 patches on pants.jpg

Can you imagine someone these days doing that?  Now there are many reasons why you see very few patched pants on kids today.  Probably the biggest one is that the general level of affluence in society among all economic groups is greater than it was 50 years ago.  There’s less of a need to patch pants when you can afford to just buy a new pair for a reasonable price.  Another factor is personnel-related. How many families have an in-house grandma who’s got the time, skill, equipment and willingness to do it?

 Today the cultural ethic of conservation and recycling has mostly become the province of environmentalism. I have mixed feelings about this development. On the one hand I think it’s good to carry on the traditions of frugality regardless of the rationale. But I tend to look at these things more from a moral perspective rather than just a “green” perspective. The two are not always in synch. But, that’s a topic for another day!

What I’ve been leading up to here is that it’s good to recycle and reuse and that at Elite, we have come up with a way to allow you to reuse your bubble envelopes while still having it your way.  The answer is our Smart Bubble ™ product.  Like all good ideas, it’s very simple. We print you an envelope in however many colors you want, with as much coverage as you’d like and we provide it with a removable bubble sleeve.  We can do these in small quantities if you’d like with the same quick turnaround we provide on just about everything we make.  The removable sleeve can be re used or recycled.  Sometimes it’s good to have the item that’s been shipped in the envelope stored in the same protective packaging once it’s removed.  Or you can use the liner to send something else or add protection to something you’re shipping in a box.

 With Elite’s Smart Bubble™ envelope, you can have your favorite design and ship it too.  (Patches not included!) 

Topics: elite envelope, bubble envelopes, smart bubble envelopes, recycling envelopes

Print, Mail & Envelopes in the New Century

Posted by Jerry Velona on Sep 16, 2016 3:20:45 PM

Ask most anyone these days in the print, mail or envelope industry about the current state and future of mail and you’ll generally get an answer that’s hopeful but cautious.  The great digital disruption of the last 25 years or so has caused an irrevocable change in printed communication.  Those of us who’ve seen these changes as they’ve occurred are naturally wary about what is to come.  It hasn't always been pretty!

nervous_person.jpg

On the one hand mergers and acquisitions continue apace with smaller, less capitalized companies unable to profit in the new landscape and selling out (if they’re lucky) to larger firms more able to diversify and adapt to changing market conditions. Obviously, creative destruction is part of every sector of the economy and generally indicates overall health in the market. But it does seem that there’s more of it going on in our industries of late and it’s been accelerated by the ubiquity of smart phones among other things. Not a week goes by when we don’t receive some notice of an equipment auction. Used envelope and printing equipment has never been less expensive and more available. That’s a tangible sign of over-capacity due to a still-shrinking market.

However on the other hand direct mail is certainly coming back with a vengeance.  After a relatively brief flirtation with relying exclusively on digital-based marketing, fund-raising companies as well as colleges and other large institutions are coming back to mail solicitations because they achieve better results even with the added costs of printing, envelopes and postage.  And at Elite Envelope, we have seen a significant increase in new customers comprised of small start-ups ranging from print brokers, consultants, marketing agencies, and craftspeople making a high value product that needs to be mailed in a printed bubble envelope or promoted with a full-color package including a window envelope and reply envelope.

We speak to customers every week who are changing their business around; getting into providing new services and products to customers in order to capture more of their business. And far from being the bane of our existence, technology is enabling us to work smarter with more information at our fingertips and marketing software and website apps which allow a one-person marketing “department” to reach thousands (or millions) of potential customers with a few clicks.

It might sound contradictory for companies in the print communication business to use website and e mail to such an extent to promote their wares but it’s really not.  It’s all part of the grand, shaking-out and reorganizing that’s going on not just in our industries but in just about every business across the entire economy.  And what we’re finding is that print and mail is settling in to have its place in the mix of ways people communicate, sell and solicit.   It’s up to us to increase the value of what we provide and hopefully our share of the market.

Topics: elite envelope, envelopes and printing, envelope industry, declining mail volume, printed bubble mailers

Paper Comes Back (or it never really left)

Posted by Jerry Velona on Jul 19, 2016 12:59:35 PM

One of the most predictable things in life is that changes and trends tend to move drastically in one direction only to be followed by a re-calibration.  It’s part of our nature to become infatuated by something new and different.  But after the full effects are consumed and digested, things tend to settle back into some rough equilibrium.  

Of course this isn’t true in all cases.  Once the automobile came onto the scene, horse-drawn transportation became a decidedly niche activity and stayed that way.  But not all social trends or new technological developments are as obviously superior as the car. 

It’s remarkable to think that the internet as we know it and use it today has really only become widespread within the past twenty years or so. The world has profoundly changed as a result and it’s been a positive change in almost all respects.  

High technology in all its forms has pushed paper aside in many ways and for many reasons; some having to do with convenience, some with cost, some with (often faulty) environmental concerns.  But inevitably, the “digestion” period has begun and people are starting to process these changes, seeing the negatives as well as the positives and acting accordingly.

A few recent examples illustrate this:

Item - In a June 22nd article in the Boston Globe - "Millennial's strange love affair with greeting cards" Janelle Nanos writes about how young adults are seeing the superior personal connection of a written note and card versus a "throwaway" message on Facebook or Snapcha and are buying them in significant quantities.  The demand is mostly fulfilled through small, boutique card companies that market online.  Improved printing technology and lower upfront costs have reduced the barrier to entry in the market.

Item – In a July 10th essay in the Wall Street Journal entitled "I'm Banning Laptops from My Classroom" , Rutgers law school professor Stuart Green makes his case against the use of computers in his class. His reason quite simply is that many students are distracted and doing other things rather than listening and engaging in the lecture.  He seems this as an endemic problem in society as a whole especially among Millennials – a state of perpetual distraction.  Starting this fall, students in Professor Green’s class will have to go back to writing notes on paper.

Item – An article in Fortune magazine from April 16th, "Air Dryers Disperse Viruses" summarizes a recent study conducted by the Journal of Applied Microbiology which showed that hand dryers, in particular the Dyson model where you stick your hands in, spread germs wildly around the restroom as opposed to using a paper towel which confines the germs primarily to the trash.  Now, I’ve read where the methodology of this study might have exaggerated the results. I haven’t read the study. But the conclusions seems to pass the common sense test at least to me.  (Personally, I’ve always preferred the paper towel to the air dryer).

Item – In an Info Trends blog dated June 7th, entitled "Millennials Won't Respond to Printed Catalogs and Direct Mail, Right? WRONG!" data is presented to demonstrate the headline’s thesis.  I have to say that even I was surprised at the findings which showed a very high percentage of the 18-34 age group studied finding catalogs useful and opening direct mail pieces they receive.  The article makes the point that after a period of decline, both catalogs and direct mail are experiencing a resurgence because they get results.  Sound familiar?

So are we seeing a return to paper and printing on paper and envelopes as a general counter-trend?  I’ve presented some anecdotes which don’t conclusively prove the point but I believe they are indicative of the type of re-evaluation I alluded to earlier.  In my experience with Elite Envelope and Graphics, I can attest to the fact that custom made card packages for invitations and other purposes are becoming more and more popular. Some of our fastest-growing customers are in that market.

woman_reading_letter.jpg

I was going through some old photos the other day and mixed in with them were some letters I had received from my mother while in college.  My Mom passed away in 2002. What a joy it was to read those letters written in her impeccable penmanship and expressing herself in the erudite yet personal manner she was known for.  Print on paper can connect us to our past (and present) in a way that the ephemeral digital form of communication cannot. Unless of course, you print them out and save them!

 

Topics: elite envelope, envelopes, printed paper, paper;

Printed Bubble Envelopes at Elite Envelope

Posted by Jerry Velona on Apr 26, 2016 1:55:44 PM

Who knew that bubble wrap would have such an interesting backstory?

According to Wikipedia, Bubble wrap was invented in 1957 by two engineers named Alfred Fielding and Marc Chavannes in Hawthorne, New Jersey. Initially, Fielding and Chavannes sealed two shower curtains together, creating some air bubbles, which they originally tried to sell as wallpaper(!).  Predictably, the wallpaper market did not prove very fruitful.  They then tried marketing it as greenhouse insulation with similar lack of success.

Although Bubble Wrap was branded by Sealed Air Corporation (founded by Fielding and Chavannes) in 1960, it was not until a year later that its use in protective packaging was discovered.  As a packaging material, Bubble Wrap's first client was IBM which used the product to protect one of its large, mainframe computers during shipment.  Fielding and Chavannes were inducted into the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame in 1993 and why not?  Their invention became one of the most useful products in its era.

Eventually Sealed Air figured out a way to line envelopes with its bubble product at which time the bubble envelope or bubble mailer was conceived.  I don’t have any hard numbers on this but I’m guessing that bubble envelopes reached a peak in popularity during the halcyon days of compact discs. There was/is really nothing better in which to mail a CD than a bubble envelope. CDs are not as popular as they once were but bubble envelopes seem to be increasing in popularity from the plethora of small internet companies selling products that require some modest protection when shipping.

Elite Envelope gets a lot of hits on its website from small entrepreneurs who require bubble envelopes. Most of them want printing on the envelopes. A fair number want full coverage printing on the front and back.  This is almost impossible to find in the market for the simple reason that bubble envelopes cannot feed through a four color press. A few years ago we responded with our “Smart Bubble” product. By using a removable bubble sleeve, we are able to print pretty much any type of coverage on a paper, Tyvek or Herculink envelope first and then insert the bubble sleeve.  The protection is exactly the same and it has the added benefit of allowing the bubble sleeve itself to be reused or recycled rather than thrown in the trash with the envelope – hence the “Smart” part.

We’ve had some success with this product but recently, our engineers, actually one of our highly capable staff members Chris Gorman, devised a way to print pre made bubble envelopes by changing the configuration of one of our old presses (talk about recycling!).  Chris is our lead pressman and floor manager for our printing department. He’s forgotten more about printing envelopes than I’ll ever know. We’ve printed these envelopes below on our “bubble press” and the quality is excellent.

s_elite_samples_kahn_2016_14.jpg

Because printed bubble envelopes and printed bubble mailers are not easy to produce, there are not many sources which, predictably, makes them more expensive with less order flexibility (Not to mention long waits for quotes and deliveries).  Many times a customer will face a 5,000 minimum on a printed item.  That’s usually a lot more than your typical small business can justify.  With Elite, you can order as few as you want.  There will be a minimum set-up charge but we’ll be happy to print as few as 500 for you.  We’ll also deliver in our usual 5-7 work days or sooner depending on when we get the order.

So for pre-made bubble envelopes printed one or two colors up to around 9 x 12 overall size or pretty much any size envelope printed up to four colors with a “Smart Bubble” insert, we’re here to help!

Topics: elite envelope, smart bubble envelopes, printed bubble envelopes, printed bubble mailers

Pushing the Envelope: Talk versus E Mail

Posted by Jerry Velona on Feb 24, 2016 9:59:22 AM

I was talking to my daughter the other day about something funny I saw on Facebook. Someone had posted a picture of what used to be on the TV screen when the programming stopped in the early morning hours.  Kind of looked like this!  It was accompanied by a continuous low beep that lasted until the early morning hours when the shows would start up again.  Yes kids; that really used to happen.

Now we’ve come so far since then that my 16 year old daughter didn’t see it as such a laughable relic of olden times because in 2016, her connection to television, especially the broadcast variety is tenuous at best.  Most of what she watches these days is on You Tube or Netflix or from links she picks up on social media.  Television; the fantastic gadget that tantalized my parents’ generation at the 1939 World’s Fair is now pretty much consigned by the iGens to “whatever” status.

Another story about the “good old days” that I regale her with occasionally concerns the land line telephone. Yes, my child there were obnoxious sounding busy signals which just kept going and going until you hung up. If the line was busy and you had to speak to someone, you just kept calling until you got through. And when my big sister used to speak to her friends, she had to pull the cord and walk part way down the basement stairs and close the door behind her so she had some privacy.  This maneuver didn’t deter my grandmother who used to gingerly pick up her extension upstairs and listen in while covering the mouthpiece with her hand.  

 

talking_on_the_telephone.png

These days what used to be generational changes are happening within a much smaller timeframe. In the span of the past ten years or so, e mailing, like Facebook, has become more of a middle-aged thing.  My mother used to cut out articles she wanted me to read from the newspaper and magazines and send them to me.  Now I do the same thing with my kids but via e mail.  My older kids – both in their mid-thirties will read and respond. My youngest rarely even opens them. To her, e mails are something you get from school (or your parents!) and should mostly be ignored. If you want to reach her and get a reasonably quick response, you pretty much have to text.

E mail, however, still rules in business – at least in the envelope converting and web printing business.  In fact, the sheer number of e mails I get each day has become somewhat burdensome.  Now, I’m NEVER going to complain about a customer requesting something via e mail, or a prospect for that matter.  Hearing from customers; quoting on jobs, expediting requests and orders, and providing general customer service is the lifeblood of a business. It is something we value and is certainly not a problem.

But reading, considering and responding to those e mails, especially when they require some action on our part, takes up a lot of time.  Which leads me to my point (finally!).   I think we’ve become too used to e mail to the point where we’ll generate a trail of three, four or many more about a single subject when one simple and shorter phone call would do.  Now there is something to be said for typing up a quick note and sending and moving quickly on to the next thing before having to respond. I think we get into a groove with that activity and it gives us the sense that we’re being productive and plowing forward. Trouble is, I’m afraid in many cases we’re wasting time.  Why not just give the person a call and review everything in one (hopefully short) phone call?  Speaking in real time can resolve questions that might take several e mails back and forth as in; “is THIS what you meant?”, etc. Plus an actual conversation can reinforce any type of relationship business or personal much better than trading notes.

My grandmother, who was all about saving time would approve. Of course she wouldn’t be too interested to listen in on conversations discussing the best way to print an envelope or why web presses are the best option for direct mail printing.  My sister’s conversations with her boyfriends were much more interesting!

Topics: elite envelope, envelopes, envelope printing, pushing the envelope, web printing

New Year’s Envelope, Print & Mail Wishes

Posted by Jerry Velona on Jan 5, 2016 10:18:34 AM

 Happy_New_Year.jpg

 

Random comments on where we sit in 2015 and some hopes for 2016:

2015 was a pretty good year for envelopes and print. Each company has its unique story and set of circumstances but it seems that the print market contraction, greatly exacerbated by the financial crisis of 2008/2009, has leveled off with fewer players which was an unfortunate necessity.

The demand for direct mail components is a big part of where the business is coming from these days.  In the past, the ease and negligible cost of e mail led many marketers to believe that they could solicit new clients on the cheap. In most cases, the results confirmed the adage that “you get what you pay for”.  Despite the higher cost, the ROI for direct mail is greater than e mail which has led to an “all of the above” approach with direct mail firmly in the mix.

Social media has become a big part of business marketing – some say an indispensable part.  While I think that’s true for some companies, I don’t think it’s as true in the envelope, printing and direct mail world at least in my experience.  I’m open to being persuaded that Elite Envelope & Graphics should have a Facebook page and a Twitter account. But I have yet to hear a good argument that takes into account how we (and thousands of companies like us) actually do business on a daily basis. I still believe that my time is better spent speaking to a customer on the phone or meeting or even e mailing with them than Tweeting something out.  Social media stresses a personal connection to the audience. While establishing those close connections where possible and where appropriate have always been a part of building customer loyalty, it isn’t essential in our business.  There’s also the lack-of-time factor: both the time I’d need to spend posting interesting content and the time required by my customers to be checking Facebook or Twitter during work hours in the course of their mostly very busy days.

A noticeable trend in our industries is the movement toward smaller quantities.  The information age allows everyone to be their own corporation with their office in their pocket.  At the same time the revolution in digital printing has “lowered the entry bar” just as the advances in personal and mobile computing have done for start-ups in general. We all need to adjust our business models to be able to produce smaller quantity jobs profitably.

Another boon to the envelope industry in particular related to the many small “Etsy –type” businesses out there is the need for shipping materials.  The demand for heavy duty envelopes like Tyvek and Herculink along with bubble envelopes and board mailers has increased dramatically in the past five years or so.

What end of year blog column would be complete without a New Year’s wish?  Mine is for the Post Office to be reformed in a meaningful way which would allow it be more streamlined and cost effective for the demands of the new century.  As readers of this blog are aware, I favor a complete break-up of the first class mail government monopoly. I think it’s an outdated model and its bloat and inflexibility is a real danger to the direct mail industry which relies on it to move things efficiently at a reasonably competitive cost. While even partial privatization seems like a pipedream, perhaps the younger generation moving into Congress will look at this in a new way and can come up with a compromise that would help ensure the health of direct mail and the envelope and printing businesses that rely on it.

In any event, best wishes for a happy, healthy and prosperous 2016. Happy New Year!

Topics: direct mail, elite envelope, envelopes, post office, tyvek envelopes, smart bubble envelopes

Full View Display Window Envelopes

Posted by Jerry Velona on Nov 25, 2015 11:53:00 AM

I try to keep this blog as informative as possible on matters of general interest to those in the print, envelope and direct mail communities.  When I started, I thought that after a while I might have trouble thinking of things to write about.  Well, this is my one hundred and fourteenth blog entry (pausing for awkward pat on my own back) and while finding new topics is getting a little more challenging (OK, so I do repeat myself once in a while; sue me.) I’ve been able to figure it out for the most part. I hope you like reading them and please send me your comments. I love getting them.

Anyway, while I try to keep the blog focused on things you might find interesting, every so often I surrender to the little sales guy perched on my shoulder who will bug me occasionally with comments like, “Hey Jerry, why don’t you let them know what you’re selling these days?  After all, you are in business to make money right?”  (He also bugs me about not making enough cold calls, being out of touch with certain customers and other things I won’t bore you about. Doesn’t everyone have voices in their head?)

elite envelope full view window envelopes

So, to placate this annoying little dude, I thought I would take this opportunity to make you aware of our latest product offering: full view window envelopes also known as display window envelopes.  We've actually been making and supplying these items since our inception in 2003.  But we are now starting to offer on line ordering and fulfillment from our website at www.eliteenvelope.com.  We've just added a window from our home page which will take you to our on line store  where you can purchase 6 x 9 full view window envelopes and 6 x 9 1/2 full view window envelopes. These envelopes have 4 x 7 and 4 x 7 1/2 display windows which allow for the contents to show through.  The purpose is to show off what's inside in order to entice the recipient to open it and take a look. 

At Elite we print and convert envelopes with lots of very eye-catching designs.  Direct mailers have learned that one of the ways to get their mail opened is to create some connection at the point of receipt; i.e. when the letter is removed from the mailbox and held in the hand.  Once it gets put down, there's much less of a chance that it will be opened. Life has moved on and there are other things to think about.  Most likely the envelope will end up in the recycling bin or the trash.  Using a splash of color or a clever tagline or photos or all of the above can help to create interest and encourage the recipient to peek inside. 

Full view window envelopes go a step further by partially displaying the contents thereby indicating what's inside and enticing with just enough of a tease to get someone to bite. There's also something to be said for a good looking package that someone has obviously spent a bit of money on.  Many people will respect that alone and open and read out of courtesy if not for any other reason.  I don't have any stats or studies to back this up but I believe it passes the common sense test.

We can provide full view envelopes in just about any size but the 6 x 9’s and 6 x 9 ½’s are our best deal and you can find great pricing and fast delivery through our website or the links above.  We’ll print them for you too!

Since I’m writing this on the day before, let me take the opportunity to wish you all a very happy Thanksgiving.  I am personally grateful for the success of Elite Envelope & Graphics and thank any of you who have placed an order with us of any size.  Despite all our problems and travails, I believe we are fortunate to live in this great country of ours so, in addition to giving thanks for our personal blessings of friends, family and material comfort I think a special shout-out is in order:  God Bless America!

Topics: elite envelope, custom window envelopes, display window envelopes, full view window envelopes

Yet Another Blog Post

From Jerry Velona - co-owner,

Elite Envelope & Graphics, Inc.

Jerry offers pertinent, often useful information on envelope converting and printing, web printing, direct mail, the post office, songs that have to do with mail and letters, digital overload and much more!

(Non-spam) Comments always appreciated.  Spread it around!

 

Subscribe to Email Updates

Recent Posts

Posts by Topic

see all