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Pushing the Envelope Beyond Ordinary

Print, Mail & Envelopes in the New Century

Posted by Jerry Velona on Sep 16, 2016 3:20:45 PM

Ask most anyone these days in the print, mail or envelope industry about the current state and future of mail and you’ll generally get an answer that’s hopeful but cautious.  The great digital disruption of the last 25 years or so has caused an irrevocable change in printed communication.  Those of us who’ve seen these changes as they’ve occurred are naturally wary about what is to come.  It hasn't always been pretty!

nervous_person.jpg

On the one hand mergers and acquisitions continue apace with smaller, less capitalized companies unable to profit in the new landscape and selling out (if they’re lucky) to larger firms more able to diversify and adapt to changing market conditions. Obviously, creative destruction is part of every sector of the economy and generally indicates overall health in the market. But it does seem that there’s more of it going on in our industries of late and it’s been accelerated by the ubiquity of smart phones among other things. Not a week goes by when we don’t receive some notice of an equipment auction. Used envelope and printing equipment has never been less expensive and more available. That’s a tangible sign of over-capacity due to a still-shrinking market.

However on the other hand direct mail is certainly coming back with a vengeance.  After a relatively brief flirtation with relying exclusively on digital-based marketing, fund-raising companies as well as colleges and other large institutions are coming back to mail solicitations because they achieve better results even with the added costs of printing, envelopes and postage.  And at Elite Envelope, we have seen a significant increase in new customers comprised of small start-ups ranging from print brokers, consultants, marketing agencies, and craftspeople making a high value product that needs to be mailed in a printed bubble envelope or promoted with a full-color package including a window envelope and reply envelope.

We speak to customers every week who are changing their business around; getting into providing new services and products to customers in order to capture more of their business. And far from being the bane of our existence, technology is enabling us to work smarter with more information at our fingertips and marketing software and website apps which allow a one-person marketing “department” to reach thousands (or millions) of potential customers with a few clicks.

It might sound contradictory for companies in the print communication business to use website and e mail to such an extent to promote their wares but it’s really not.  It’s all part of the grand, shaking-out and reorganizing that’s going on not just in our industries but in just about every business across the entire economy.  And what we’re finding is that print and mail is settling in to have its place in the mix of ways people communicate, sell and solicit.   It’s up to us to increase the value of what we provide and hopefully our share of the market.

Topics: elite envelope, envelopes and printing, envelope industry, declining mail volume, printed bubble mailers

Selling Envelopes and Print in the Digital Age

Posted by Jerry Velona on Mar 30, 2015 11:25:00 AM

Elite Envelope blog

“It was twenty years ago today.”

Yes, I know, a shameless attempt to get you into my blog by quoting the famous opening line from Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.  But as I was getting my day going on a 32 degree “spring” morning in late March, I realized that my work life changed dramatically just about twenty years ago. It might as well have been the Stone Age.

 I was in sales at Northeastern Envelope Manufacturing Corporation of Braintree, MA. My boss was not just old school; he was the principal of the old school.  As such he insisted on a daily call report from me which up to that point I had dutifully hand-written and submitted, five at a time, at the end of each week.  

 I had recently purchased and began using my first personal computer sometime in 1994. I was just getting used to it and had heard of ACT contact management software. I decided to give it a shot so in the spring of 1995, I uploaded all my contacts, built a data base and began generating and printing my daily reports.  This was initially not met with enthusiasm by my boss who was still using index cards to keep track of his contacts. However, he eventually (but grudgingly) accepted the reports, and I was off and running into the information age.

My next life-altering experience came later that same year when I got my first cellphone.  Up to that point I had a pager or “beeper” as we called it firmly affixed to my belt. One of the inside staff at our office would call the pager number to let me know that someone had called looking for me.  I would have to find a pay phone, pull out my trusty roll of dimes and call the office to receive the message and then call the person back. This happened many times each day I was on the road.

I remember the first day I used my cellphone on the job. I called a colleague of mine to joyously announce that I was actually walking around downtown Boston talking to her on the phone.  I was so excited!  No longer would I have to use a payphone in the rain while juggling my notes and umbrella and fumbling for the dial. 

Just those two things increased my productivity (and my income) tremendously.  I was a bit of a late adopter but I think it was around twenty years ago that cell phones and e mails started becoming a big part of the daily life in business. 

Well here we are in 2015 and I’m still using ACT (a much later and improved version) and have had a succession of upgraded phones leading to my IPhone 6 which I love.  I can pretty much run major parts of my business through my smart phone.  Technology enables me to do meetings on line, answer my e mail from wherever I happen to be, send links of video to prospective customers and run a fairly sophisticated marketing operation solo.  All stuff I wouldn’t have imagined “twenty years ago today”.  (A second Beatle reference in that last sentence – so clever!)

So what did I spend a majority of my time doing last week? Calling and e mailing customers to set up face to face appointments.  I was able to line up several and each one of them was very productive. In each case I learned something new about our customer’s requirements and how we might be able to better compete to meet them. I also was able to personally express our gratitude for their business and end with a handshake which is not something you can do digitally.

Technology has changed our world and our business. I hear a lot of envelope manufacturers, envelope printers and web printers grousing about how the decline in overall volumes due mostly to computers and software have pointed our industry toward inexorable decline.  There’s some truth to that but print on paper and direct mail are here to stay. 

We need to embrace the enhanced ability to be more productive provided by new technologies and use them to our advantage. At the same time, we also need to remember that ours is a personal business based on strong relationships forged by customer service.  It’s easier to send an e mail and there are many times when that is the best approach. But there is no substitute for face-to-face meetings whenever they can be accomplished either in cultivating new business or cementing existing relationships.  Despite all the great toys and tools at our disposal, successfuly selling envelopes and print in 2015 is not all that much different than it used to be.

To meet the challenges of remaining viable and profitable it helps to remember, to quote from another great song from a different era, “the fundamental things apply as time goes by.”

Topics: direct mail, envelope printing, envelope industry, envelope manufacturer, web printing, envelope sales, printing sales

Post Office Keeps Trying – Direct Mail World Keeps Hoping

Posted by Jerry Velona on May 27, 2014 11:06:00 AM

The ongoing mess at Veteran’s Administration hospitals across the country is yet another example of the futility of providing necessary services through a bureaucratic, unionized government monopoly.  In a market-based enterprise, the imperative of good customer service is driven by entrepreneurial energy, the desire for upward mobility and profits as well as competitive pressure.  In the government model, these factors are virtually non-existent and instead are replaced by an unholy alliance of rent-seeking politicians, interest groups, corporate supplicants and union bosses whose primary mission is to preserve the jobs of their members at all costs.

The latter factor was on painful display recently in a recent article in the BostonGlobe entitled “Postal Union Targets Staples over Mail Services Program”.  In 2013, the Post Office entered in a deal with Staples to put small customer centers in 82 of the office supply company’s retail locations.  The mini-postal counters would provide most of the services available at Post Offices.  “Customers like it because it’s more convenient and we’re open longer hours,” said a Staples spokesman.  Sounds like a reasonable plan to provide better service at a lower cost from an enterprise that lost “only” $5 billion in 2013; the seventh straight year of huge losses for the Post Office.

 Well apparently it’s not reasonable to the Postal Workers Union who’ve been picketing Staples stores with signs that read “The US Mail is Not For Sale” (?).  The article points out that the USPS already has deals with over 3,600 small businesses throughout the country to provide basic postal services. I’m guessing that a big, fat corporate target like Staples provides a more useful foil for the protests than the small independently-owned pharmacy. 

 While I’ve been critical of the Post Office in previous posts, I’m a fan of the present Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe who’s been trying to bring the costs of the Post Office in line with current revenues which have been trending downward for many years.  The Staples deal is just the latest attempt to bring about a win-win with two entities that have been struggling with the trend away from paper and mail. The union was able to scuttle a similar deal with Sears decades ago. They are now gearing up to increase the pressure through the teachers and other large unions.  Will Staples management eventually cave?  Will the union ever be realistic about the need for the Post Office to balance its budget for their own long-term survival?  Pardon me for being pessimistic about the likely answers to those questions.

The real victims here, besides the taxpayers who must continue to fund the Post Office deficits, are the direct mail, print and envelope industries which continue to swim against the tide of higher paper costs and postal rates.  According to a recent article in the DMA newsletter, second quarter periodical mailing volume decreased 7.8%. This follows a recent rate increase of 5.9% passed by the Postal Rate Commission late in 2013.  At that time, many in the direct mail industry protested that the increase would depress volume. The Post Office responded that mail rates were “inelastic” or mostly irrelevant to the mailing industry.

Direct Mail Elite Envelope & Graphics

The recent drop in catalog mailing volume may be an anomaly and small increases in mailing costs may not have significant short-term impact. But unless we suspend the basic laws of economics, prices do matter and they will affect the decisions of mailers to mail, printers to print and envelope makers to convert to some extent at some point.  Those effects will be mostly negative unless the Post Office can find ways to end-run Congress and implement the necessary cost-savings measures.

In the meantime: stay strong Staples!

Topics: direct mail, post office problems, envelope industry, direct mail printing, declining mail volume

National’s Demise and the State of the Envelope

Posted by Jerry Velona on Sep 10, 2013 12:10:00 PM

As anyone who works in the envelope and printing industry is aware, National Envelope has recently been acquired by Cenveo and will face liquidation of some sort. As of this writing, it’s still unclear how much of National’s capacity will remain. Cenveo already maintains approximately 20 envelope plants throughout the US and the overall amount of first class mail has been in decline for the past decade so it says here that most of National’s plants will be closed and sold off in order to solidify Cenveo’s leadership position in the market.

National Envelope was one of those great American success stories. Started by William Unger, a Holocaust survivor who arrived in America on a ship for displaced persons after the war, the company  grew to become the largest privately held envelope manufacturer in the United States. National was known as a quality shop with a very solid market position primarily as a wholesaler. At a time when American manufacturing was shifting away from low-tech products in textiles, shoes and other consumables, envelope manufacturing provided solid jobs for thousands with good wages and benefits.

National filed for bankruptcy over three years ago and was acquired by a California-based private equity company called The Gores Group. At that time, Cenveo was making a bid for the company but it seemed that the Ungar family couldn’t stand the thought of surrendering the company to their fiercest competitor so they saw the Gores offer as the better choice.  It was always curious why a private equity company would consider a company like National a candidate for a turnaround and sale for a profit. The company was over $500 million in debt in a declining industry.The fact of overcapacity in the envelope market was as clear then as it is now. But while Gores closed a few of National’s plants and sold off a bunch of its equipment (at bargain-basement prices) it seemed to keep the same low-margin pricing structure that one could argue was one of the prime causes of National’s decline and eventual demise.

Gores tried to impose draconian production controls on some of the plants. This resulted in some adverse publicity and ultimately did nothing to solve the problem. As anyone who runs a factory is aware, treating your employees well makes for a happier and more productive environment. I also had some fun with Gore’s somewhat lame attempts at spinning the purchase of National and wrapping the package in meaningless MBA jargon.

The news about the second Chapter 11 filing by National Envelope and its impending liquidation earlier in the summer was played by most of the press as the end of an era and symbolic of the decline of the envelope and mailing industry.

Those of us in the industry know that's a convenient media angle but ultimately a superficial take on the story. National's problems were mostly self-inflicted. There's certainly been a decline in first class mail in the past decade but there are still billions of envelopes being mailed and the direct mail industry has seen growth during the same period.

It’s truly a shame that thousands of people will likely lose their jobs as a result of the National bankruptcy. If there’s a lesson to be learned, it’s that the model of the large, high-overhead envelope operation selling its product at commodity prices is mostly over.

We believe the future of our industry lies with the smaller, regional companies that provide value and great service to their customers. While first class mail volumes are declining due to the inexorable expansion of the digital economy, direct mail has remained a viable way for companies to promote their products. The percentage of direct mail as a total of the overall postal volume has increased and continues to do so. Marketers are re-discovering direct mail as a solid (literally) alternative to digital information overload.

The envelope companies who keep their costs at a reasonable level with little leverage, stay lexible and responsive to customer demands, use technology to its maximum advantage, constantly add value to their product offerings and aggressively market and sell will stay viable well into the twenty first century. Print and mail isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

In the meantime, RIP National Envelope and may its many fine employees find productive work either in the envelope industry or elsewhere.

 

Topics: direct mail, envelopes and printing, printing and envelopes, envelope industry, declining mail volume, national envelope

Fixing the Post Office and Saving Direct Mail

Posted by Jerry Velona on Mar 4, 2013 9:06:00 AM

old fashioned post office photo

In my last post, I listed some of the factors contributing to the huge drop in overall mail volume and the sorry fiscal state of the US Postal Service.  Certainly the two are related; any business that sees a precipitous decline in its customer base due to factors somewhat out of its control is going to suffer.

However, this is not the first time a business has declined due to new technologies or its own inefficiency. IBM was once the center of the mainframe computing universe; until personal computing and the incredible advances in microchip technology revolutionized the market. Big Blue’s leadership was supplanted by Apple, Microsoft, Intel and a host of other companies but over time it remained viable by reinventing itself and today remains a major player in the high tech world

Can the Post Office pull off the same transformation as IBM?  Certain factors weigh heavily against that outcome. First and foremost is that there is no free, competitive market for first class mail delivery. The USPS holds a monopoly on this service and in the present statist era it seems unlikely that the federal government would loosen the reins and allow other companies to compete and provide this service as it did successfully with parcel delivery. 

A major factor in IBM’s decline was the 13 year-long antitrust suit initiated by the Justice Department. The after-effects of this litigation paved the way for other companies to compete on equal footing which helped give rise to the proliferation of desk top computing. Antitrust law is based on the premise that monopoly power in any business is not good for the consumer. Of course the government reserves the right to a double-standard but its own monopolies are just as bad.  

What would be the result of eliminating the monopoly on letter delivery? We are told that companies would simply cherry-pick the most profitable routes - mostly those in densely populated urban areas – and would leave the rest of the population to pay higher delivery rates. We usually hear this from those who have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo. The problem is the status quo is unsustainable. 

One thing we know about markets is that when people are free to come up with solutions, customer demands are generally met. None of us can predict with any certainty what would happen in the aftermath of a post office breakup. But we can look to the coexistence of UPS, FedEx and the Post Office in parcel delivery as a possible model for a better future.  Maybe we will need a drastically scaled-down version of the Post Office to continue to service rural areas on a subsidized basis.  Maybe the companies that bid for the prime routes will have to accept some of the burden to serve those areas in the same way that cities require developers of prime property to include parks and other public accommodations. Regulated utilities are required to allow smaller, private companies to supply power to households and businesses at a reduced rate. Maybe we can use the existing mail delivery infrastructure to facilitate something like that.

One thing is certain; without some type of radical reform, the taxpayers will be paying billions to bail out a once proud and once necessary institution. Additionally, the companies and individuals in the printing, mailing and envelope industries who rely in large measure on the post office will suffer due to increased costs and declining service.

As always, your comments are very much appreciated and welcome.

Topics: direct mail, post office, printing and envelopes, postal monopoly, post office problems, envelope industry

The Post Office and the Envelope Industry – Part One

Posted by Jerry Velona on Feb 6, 2013 12:43:00 PM

As anyone who keeps up with current events is aware, the United States Postal Service is in a very bad way.

The price of a first class stamp has just gone up again to 46 cents. If only that solved the problem, then we’d just accept it and move on. However, the Post Office posted a $15.9 billion dollar loss for the fiscal year that just ended in September 30th of 2012. And if that’s not enough bad news for you, they are declaring that they will be out of cash sometime around October of 2013 unless something is done.

As the chart below demonstrates, (courtesy of the Wall Street Journal) the volume of first class mail has seen a precipitous decline in the past ten years. The number of pieces mailed is now about half of what it was in 2002.

Mail Service decline graph

Now obviously the digital world has made a serious dent in the number of pieces mailed. Companies are saving money by pushing their customers to pay their bills and receive statements on-line.  Financial service companies which used to mail huge numbers of proxy statements and prospectuses are now going digital. Back in the 1980's, I was a bank purchasing officer and we bought huge amounts of paper and printing much of which is no longer necessary because of the personal computing revolution. You can’t stop companies from reducing their costs through greater efficiency; especially when it’s what most of their customers find more convenient.

Another significant factor in the decrease in mail is the lousy economy of the past four years. The so-called recovery we have been experiencing is tepid at best with growth that doesn’t even keep up with the increase in new people entering the job market. While the movement away from certain kinds of mail would have happened regardless, robust economic growth would mitigate some of the pain for envelope and printing companies.

In its attempt to cut costs, the Post Office has slowed down first class mail delivery and is considering cutting Saturday delivery service. This is probably the worst possible way to deal with the problem. We are in the age of instant gratification courtesy of those same computers that are driving down the mail business. A recent article in the Boston Globe references a study by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project concerning people under the age of 35 and the dangers of their hyper connected lives with this warning:  “Negative effects include a need for instant gratification and loss of patience”.   So at the same time that Gen X and Gen Y are moving away from mail partly due to the time involved, the Post Office decides to make us wait longer. Great.

As I’ve suggested in previous posts, the politics surrounding Post Office reform will make it virtually impossible to fix.  Yet, the best solution  for direct mailers and the many small businesses that serve them would be to abolish the government monopoly on first class mail service and allow private companies to compete for that service in the same way that FedEx and UPS have done for parcel delivery.  That would allow direct mailers who provide the biggest chunk of concentrated business for the post office to receive preferred rates which would drive down the cost of direct mail and keep it strong along with the printers and envelope companies who provide the components.

In my next post, I’ll delve into the politics in a bit more detail and also flesh out a simple proposal for reform.  As always, your comments are most appreciated.

Topics: direct mail, elite envelope, post office, printing and envelopes, postal monopoly, post office problems, envelope industry, declining mail volume

Holiday Print and Envelope Wishlist

Posted by Jerry Velona on Dec 21, 2012 9:17:00 AM

Letter to Santa Elite Envelope

Well, 2012 is almost behind us:  another year of challenges and ups and downs but hopefully more than your share of success.  The printing and envelope industries continue to either decline or evolve depending on your outlook. I prefer the latter. While there’s no question that far fewer envelopes are being mailed today as opposed to ten years ago, direct mail has remained a vibrant and attractive tool to marketers.  New digital technologies have made personalized mail affordable.  Improved four color envelope printing equipment and technology has moved process printing firmly into the mainstream.

As I write this we are facing the end of the world according to the Mayan calendar.  My 13-year-old daughter wanted to sleep over a friend’s house to mark the occasion which was fine with me. I could use some peace and quiet before the end of time. So who knows if you’ll even be around to read this?  Just in case, here are some of my fervent hopes and wishes for 2013.

  • I wish that companies in our industry and in general would be less timid about wishing customers “Merry Christmas”.  I understand that businesses tend to be risk averse and generally will take the path of least resistance. But Christmas Day has been a national holiday since 1870 and has a healthy and ubiquitous secular side.  I know there are some that take offense at being wished Merry Christmas but they are a tiny fringe and do we really want to consider their tender feelings above the vast majority who, regardless of their religion, enjoy and celebrate the Christmas Holiday?   How about “Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays”?

  • Along the same lines, I hope that printers and envelope companies will be less accommodating to the “green” agenda which ultimately does not have our best interests in mind. I’ve written in more specific detail about this issue in previous posts.  We should all take responsibility in our personal and professional lives to use resources wisely and consider the environment. But the greens think paper consumption is bad and that’s not right.

  • To add to #2, I wish that companies in our industry would stop claiming that their products are produced with “certified wind power” when all they are doing is buying Renewable Energy Credits.  If you have a wind turbine in your parking lot or solar panels on your roof then you are entitled to make this claim.  If not, it’s misleading and more kowtowing to environmental purists who are, for the most part, not our friends.

  • I wish more customers would go back to using formal purchase orders. E mail has certainly made us more productive but getting unspecific messages to proceed on an order via e mail requires us vendors to confirm everything in writing which is really what the customer is supposed to do through a detailed and precise purchase order.  Plus, sometimes you have two or three separate trails going on the same order which requires printing out voluminous correspondence for the job ticket. (I wonder if any of these e-mail orderers have that “don’t print this e mail unless it’s absolutely necessary” message after their signature?)

  • I wish more people would stop responding “your” welcome when I say thank you for doing something for me.

  • I wish our political class would allow Postmaster General Donahoe to implement most of the reforms he’s been recommending for the past several years. The Post Office is a mess. It’s losing money at a terrifying rate and needs to be significantly downsized and reformed or face collapse. What really needs to be done is to break the monopoly and privatize the delivery of first class mail as we have with parcels with great success.  What will most likely happen is dithering followed by another taxpayer-financed bailout.

Despite the many problems we face as an industry, we can be thankful for the chance we have to persevere and dream. We can also give thanks for our friends, family and loved ones; without whom our lives would be diminished. Lastly, to everyone in the printing and envelope world: Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and may we all flourish and prosper in 2013!

 

Topics: envelope printing, postal monopoly, post office problems, envelope industry, four color envelope printing, going green, envelopes and post office, printed envelopes

The Permanence of Print

Posted by Jerry Velona on May 23, 2012 2:15:00 PM

One of the difficulties of selling in today’s printing, envelope and direct mail market is finding new and better ways to communicate the value of what we do. I suppose that’s true of any industry but those of us making our living applying ink to paper face unique challenges from the brave new digital world among other things.

A recent article by David Gelernter in the Wall Street Journal entitled, The Pros and Cons of Cyber Language provides some answers for us.

Gelernter is a professor of computer science at Yale as well as a prolific writer and artist.  In his WSJ piece he says, “Digital words are disposable words…Ink and paper (or parchment or papyrus) have functioned brilliantly as a presentation and storage medium for a couple of thousand years. It's easy to read a 300-year-old book or a 2,000-year-old scroll. Can you imagine booting a 2,000-year-old computer?”

He goes on to say that, “Digital words seem cheap because they are, and they grow cheaper by the day. Consider the withering hailstorm of mail, text, social net and blog posts that assaults you the moment you go online. It's become impossible for many a normal, solid citizen to answer his email promptly. But young people seem increasingly apt to ignore uninteresting messages on purpose. If the message is important it will be resent, and if it isn't, who cares anyway? So the value of digital words sinks even lower.”

I think what those of us who sell envelopes, printing and direct mail can take away from these insights is that there’s a certain “dignity” to the printed word (Gelernter’s word) that just doesn’t exist in an electronic message. Plus, as he says, the sheer, crushing volume of digitized communication is driving many people to look for a respite from it.  When they do that, often they will be found reading something. 

people reading the printed page

If the content is clever, the presentation is attractive and we've effectively communicated that what we provide has more staying power than the typical group of bits and bytes, perhaps what they're reading will be something we've printed or mailed.

Do you agree?

Topics: direct mail, envelopes, envelopes and printing, printing and envelopes, envelope industry, printing sales

Envelope Corporate Doublespeak

Posted by Jerry Velona on Feb 21, 2012 11:56:00 AM

In a post from last fall I promised I would return to the hilarious letter we saw from one of America’s largest envelope companies. The company filed for bankruptcy protection and was purchased by a private equity company and has been downsizing ever since. Their most recent layoff and office closing (sorry, “restructuring”) was announced in the form of a press release/public letter in October of 2011.

I mentioned at the time that while big corporations serve a need in the economy, I’ve always preferred to work for small companies. Elite Envelope has grown considerably since our humble origins in 2003, but we have managed to keep in daily contact with all of our staff and many of our customers. This has been a big part of our success.  Another factor that helps small businesses maintain a proper perspective is that losing one customer or one employee is a big deal.   The paradox of big companies is they get big by providing value to many but then they value the many less as a result.

When speaking to a big audience rather than small groups or individuals, I guess the feeling is you can spin things anyway you want. After all; you’re a massive corporation! (Or government bureaucracy – don’t get me started there)  So, here are a few more chestnuts from the aforementioned letter as promised.  (Helpful translation and/or snarky comments in parenthesis mine).

These efforts(i.e.the layoffs and office closings) will allow us to build a stronger product, service, and quality value proposition for our customers.” (Corporations love to talk about “value propositions”; sounds so “MBA”)

“The next step in the evolution of our…strategy is to build on our value proposition (there they go again) to customers by maximizing customer focus, responsiveness, and value.” (Are they saying they are going to make their customers more focused, responsive and valuable? Sign me up!)

“The consolidation allows us to…leverage technology to enhance the customer experience, and align with key Business Unit requirements (jargon alert!). This will enable cross-training to ensure capability and knowledge share of customers, markets, and other important information.” (yes, but will key Business Unit requirements be knowledge-shared as well? Discuss amongst yourselves. )

“Although this is the right thing to do for our customers and our company, it doesn’t come without change for some of our dedicated employees. (ya’ think?).

The migration of select roles from current locations into our future-state design will take place over several months”. (Migrating to the future-state?  Did they get Ray Bradbury to write this?)

More information will be shared as we move through this next phase of improving our (wait, let’s all say it together) customer value proposition and transforming (sic) to the leader of our industry."

I don’t know about you, but I can’t wait for the next letter!

Topics: elite envelope, envelope industry, corporate-speak

Direct Mail Par Excellence

Posted by Jerry Velona on Nov 7, 2011 10:07:00 AM

Massachusetts’ Democratic candidate for US Senate Elizabeth Warren recently caused a stir by asserting (I’m paraphrasing) that no one really makes it on his own.  While she has taken some justifiable heat for her statement in the specific context in which she made it, there is some truth to that proposition.

The poet John Donne wrote:

 

No man is an island entire of itself; every man
is a piece of the continent, a part of the main;

As we approach our eighth year anniversary, Elite Envelope takes justifiable pride in the success we have achieved.  Anyone who has ever started a business knows it isn’t an easy thing to do.  Couple that with the fact that envelopes and printing are mature industries in serious transition and oh, by the way, we’ve endured one of the worst recessions in modern history with no clear end in sight.  It’s been tricky, needless say.

 direct mail picture

So, we’ve worked hard and we’re proud of what we’ve done. However, we couldn’t have done it without the support of some great direct marketing companies who we’ve been fortunate to serve. We also are very fortunate to be served and associated with the New England Direct Marketing Association (NEDMA).  This is a group of very dedicated individuals who support the direct marketers in our region by sponsoring seminars, trade shows, a job bank, networking opportunities and much more.  For as long as we’ve been involved with NEDMA, Pat Lee and Beth Drysdale have been running the show with superb skill and grace. We thank them for helping to keep the direct marketing industry in New England so vital.

At the most recent NEDMA Direct Marketer awards show, we were pleased to have our printed envelopes be a part of several award-winning packages from two of our good customers, Amergent and WA Wilde. Both companies are direct mail powerhouses in our market and are two of the top companies in their field in the nation.

Our success is truly tied to the organizations like NEDMA and companies like Amergent and Wilde. They prove each day that direct mail is an important part of any marketing strategy.  We look forward to the next eight years!

Topics: direct mail, elite envelope, printing and envelopes, envelope printing, envelope industry

Yet Another Blog Post

From Jerry Velona - co-owner,

Elite Envelope & Graphics, Inc.

Jerry offers pertinent, often useful information on envelope converting and printing, web printing, direct mail, the post office, songs that have to do with mail and letters, digital overload and much more!

(Non-spam) Comments always appreciated.  Spread it around!

 

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